Category Archives: Still Photos

Jamie Miller, 7, peers out his back door at the blowing and drifting snow in his backyard in Bay City, Mich. February 2, 2011. The blizzard conditions shut down most non-essential schools, government and businesses in Bay City. Most of Michigan, including Bay County, has been hit hard by the blizzard that is sweeping across the Midwest. Officials report that the area has not seen this strong of a blizzard in 15 years. Snow thunder was heard early this morning.

I entered these photos in the Best of Photojournalism international contest sponsored by the National Press Photographers Association. All photos copyright Kent Miller, 2010.

Cute Cub: A grizzly bear cub pauses while foraging for berries at Denali National Park and Preserve.

Twin Lake Reflection: The dead calm water of Upper Twin Lake in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve in Alaska provides a mirror image of the adjoining mountains.

Scenic Stroke: Sea Kayaking is a serene way to take in the view of the area mountains at Upper Twin Lake in Lake Clark National Park in Alaska. To experience the beauty of the area, travellers must take a float plane from Anchorage which is over 100 miles away.

Great Gorge: Ruth Glacier is a glacier in Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Its upper reaches are almost three vertical miles (4.8 km) below the summit of Mount McKinley. The glacier’s “Great Gorge” is one mile wide, and drops almost 2,000 feet over ten miles, with crevasses along the surface. Above the surface on both sides are 5,000-foot  granite cliffs. From the top of the cliffs to the bottom of the glacier is a height exceeding that of the Grand Canyon. Ruth Glacier moves at a rate of 3.3 feet a day.

Mt.McKinley Ascent: Climbers begin their long journey up Mt. McKinley in Denali National Park and Preserve near base camp a Kahiltna Galcier at 4,200 feet. Climbers must fly to base camp to begin their journey. The climb takes an average of 17 days. In 2010, 670 climbers attempted the climb. There were 2 fatalities and 38 rescue missions by the National Park Service.  Weather conditions near the top of the 20,000 plus foot peak prevent about half of the climbers from making it to the summit.

Threading the Ice: A visitor to Kenai Fjords National Park admires the fallout from the calving of Bear Glacier.

Glacier Grandeur: Sea kayakers enjoy an up close view of Aialik Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park in Alaska. The glacier is accessible by boat and is about 40 miles from Seward, Alaska.

Stretch: Dall sheep rams rest stretch atop a mountain in Denali National Park and Preserve. The Alaska Mountain Range looms in the background.

Beachline Beast: A strange animal face appears on the coastline of Lake Clark in Lake Clark National Park in Alaska. The park is one of the most remote in the country because it is only accessible by small plane.

Serenity: Upper Twin Lake in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve is scenic and undisturbed. The park is only accessible via float plane. Most visitors fly from Anchorage which is over 100 miles away.

Minnow Delight: A magpie pauses with a minnow while feeding along Brooks River in Katmai National Park.

Her Main Squeeze: Pamela Westbrook performs with her python outside Webster Hall in New York City entertaining the waiting crowd before the Andrew WK show titled, “The Most Interesting Show in the World.”

Alice in Manhattan: The White Rabbit, right and the Mad Hatter spontaneously pose on the subway in Manhattan, New York on the eve of Halloween.

Reflection: K. Shubeck arrives on land at Upper Twin Lake in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve. K. spends has spent the last 11 summers at Spike’s cabin as a volunteer national park ranger for the national park service. K. and her husband, Monroe, take care of three remote cabins on the lake and welcome visitors. The highlight of the area is Dick Proenneke’s cabin which was made famous by his books and films. Proenneke spent 30 years by himself before he became ill in 1999. Upper Twin Lake is so remote that the only way to reach it is by float plane.

Scanning for Schools: A fisherman looks for schools of fish as he directs his partner before dropping their net in Charlotte Amalie Harbor in St. Thomas U.S. Virgin Islands.

Peering at the Package: A nude twelve-foot-tall statue attracts the attention of two visitors to the Time Warner Center Mall in Manhattan, New York.  Fernando Botero’s “Adam” has provided a titillating temptation to passers-by. There is so much fondling going on that Adam’s package has turned golden, making it stand out against the darker brown of the rest of the statue.

Joyful Jump: Betsy Miller, 10, jumps from a deck chair aboard Celebrities Equinox during a trip to the Caribbean. At right is her brother Jamie, 7.

Remote Reunion: K. Shubeck embraces her daughter at Upper Twin Lake in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve. K. spends has spent the last 11 summers at Spike’s cabin as a volunteer for the national park service. K. had not seen her daughter in two months. K. and her husband, Monroe, take care of three remote cabins on the lake and welcome visitors. The highlight of the area is Dick Proenneke’s cabin which was made famous by his books and films. Proenneke spent 30 years by himself before he became ill in 1999. Upper Twin Lake is so remote that the only way to reach it is by float plane.

Violinist in Red: Irene Fong of New York City, plays the violin in the stairway of Webster Hall in New York City. Fong, a struggling musician, worked the Andrew WK gig titled, “The Most Interesting Show in the World.”

The Ice Sisters: Hannah and Elsa, “The Ice Sisters,”  awe the crowd with their aerial contortionism at Webster Hall in New York City during the Andrew WK show titled, “The Most Interesting Show in the World.” The free event alternatively featured circus acts and rock songs performed by Andrew WK.

Craig took me up today to practice for the CPPA aerial seminar. We have a flight plan in mind that will circle you around campus once and then fly by the casino on our way back. If you want to deviate from it, let us know right away. After you pay the fee, you will be put on a list. You may choose your flight time, first come first serve.

aerial 01

This is my daughter, Betsy, 8, during takeoff on her first small aircraft flight. You may feel the same. This is where I will be sitting and coaching you. We will communicate through headsets. Put the mic right up against your mouth. It is voice activated. If you can hear yourself then we can hear you too.

aerial 02

This is Craig Beins. He is an amazing pilot. So good at understanding what you want to accomplish. I have worked with Craig for 10 years. Never came back without a picture. He is going to circle you around campus. Be ready as soon as you get on the plane. Bring two bodies if you can. Don’t forget to put your camera strap around your neck!

aerial 03

Do not shoot this type of scene. It is too loose. Nothing to hold your attention. Just information. Nothing more. Nothing interesting.

aerial 04

Shoot tighter. Look for good composition. Look at the light. Shoot lots! And by the way. Open the window. The wind will keep it up in the air.

aerial 05

It’s really no different than shooting out of your car traveling around 100 miles per hour. It’s windy. You will need to hold on to your camera tightly. You will need a shutter speed of at least 1/1000 of a second. I suggest aperture priority. Lens at it’s widest aperture. Set the ISO to get the shutter speed. Do not rest the camera on the window and do not rest your body on the back of the seat. Sit up straight and shoot out the window without touching anything. You will avoid heavy duty vibrations.

aerial 06

Don’t forget to shoot verticals.

aerial 07

I prefer to use an 80-200 2.8 lens. If you shoot Canon, I will have it with me to lend you. If you shoot Nikon, you can use mine. Auto focus is fine to use. Make sure your focus is on Continuous for Nikon or AI for Canon.

aerial 08

Shoot tight. Look for good angles and good light.

aerial 09

Continue shooting and using your zoom to compose. Notice this one is wider than the one above?

aerial 11

Don’t shoot directly overhead like this. Notice the strut in the way on the right? Shoot to the right of it instead of in front of it.

aerial 12

Shoot farther away and lower like this (compare to picture above).

aerial 13

Looks like the Chips are working hard to make up for last Saturday.

aerial 14

Saw it. Opened the window. Shot it.

aerial 15

This is where you will meet us.

aerial 10

It will be exhilarating, and educational. If you are timid of flying, don’t worry, you will be focused on the task at hand. Who knows. Maybe someday you will specialize in aerial photography!

Last night the stars were aligned (that is the moon…) with Bay City Hall.  The rising moon seems larger and a bit orange because we see it through lots more atmosphere when it is low to the horizon. A full moon came up just after sunset on May 27, 2010.  This was taken from atop Veterans Bridge in Bay City, Michigan with the equivalent of a 825mm lens. To keep the image sharp, I used the self timer at 2 seconds to allow the camera to stop jiggling after I pressed the shutter release. I used a Nikon D300s with a 200-400 F4 lens mounted on a tripod. The exposure was a 1/2 second at f/5.6 at ISO 200. I used Kenko’s 1.4 teleconverter. © Kent Miller

I love the feeling I get when I see something and I have to photograph it. This happened to me last night as I was heading to my car. This is Central Michigan University’s power house which provides  energy to all campus facilities and residences. ISO 200 – 8 seconds – f/8